Absurdy politycznej poprawności

kompowiec

Open Source Boy
1 609
1 510
https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/technology/weapons-of-math-destruction/index.html

Wealth: America's other racial divide
Math is racist: How data is driving inequality

By Aimee Rawlins September 6, 2016: 5:24 PM ET


It's no surprise that inequality in the U.S. is on the rise. But what you might not know is that math is partly to blame.

In a new book, "Weapons of Math Destruction," Cathy O'Neil details all the ways that math is essentially being used for evil (my word, not hers).

From targeted advertising and insurance to education and policing, O'Neil looks at how algorithms and big data are targeting the poor, reinforcing racism and amplifying inequality.


These "WMDs," as she calls them, have three key features: They are opaque, scalable and unfair.

Denied a job because of a personality test? Too bad -- the algorithm said you wouldn't be a good fit. Charged a higher rate for a loan? Well, people in your zip code tend to be riskier borrowers. Received a harsher prison sentence? Here's the thing: Your friends and family have criminal records too, so you're likely to be a repeat offender. (Spoiler: The people on the receiving end of these messages don't actually get an explanation.)


The models O'Neil writes about all use proxies for what they're actually trying to measure. The police analyze zip codes to deploy officers, employers use credit scores to gauge responsibility, payday lenders assess grammar to determine credit worthiness. But zip codes are also a stand-in for race, credit scores for wealth, and poor grammar for immigrants.


Cathy O'Neil
O'Neil, who has a PhD in mathematics from Harvard, has done stints in academia, at a hedge fund during the financial crisis and as a data scientist at a startup. It was there -- in conjunction with work she was doing with Occupy Wall Street -- that she become disillusioned by how people were using data.

"I worried about the separation between technical models and real people, and about the moral repercussions of that separation," O'Neill writes.

She started blogging -- at mathbabe.org -- about her frustrations, which eventually turned into "Weapons of Math Destruction."

One of the book's most compelling sections is on "recidivism models." For years, criminal sentencing was inconsistent and biased against minorities. So some states started using recidivism models to guide sentencing. These take into account things like prior convictions, where you live, drug and alcohol use, previous police encounters, and criminal records of friends and family.

These scores are then used to determine sentencing.

"This is unjust," O'Neil writes. "Indeed, if a prosecutor attempted to tar a defendant by mentioning his brother's criminal record or the high crime rate in his neighborhood, a decent defense attorney would roar, 'Objection, Your Honor!'"

But in this case, the person is unlikely to know the mix of factors that influenced his or her sentencing -- and has absolutely no recourse to contest them.

Or consider the fact that nearly half of U.S. employers ask potential hires for their credit report, equating a good credit score with responsibility or trustworthiness.

This "creates a dangerous poverty cycle," O'Neil writes. "If you can't get a job because of your credit record, that record will likely get worse, making it even harder to work
 

Claude mOnet

Well-Known Member
914
1 573
https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/technology/weapons-of-math-destruction/index.html





This is a modal window.

Something went wrong during native playback.
Wealth: America's other racial divide
Math is racist: How data is driving inequality

By Aimee Rawlins September 6, 2016: 5:24 PM ET


It's no surprise that inequality in the U.S. is on the rise. But what you might not know is that math is partly to blame.

In a new book, "Weapons of Math Destruction," Cathy O'Neil details all the ways that math is essentially being used for evil (my word, not hers).

From targeted advertising and insurance to education and policing, O'Neil looks at how algorithms and big data are targeting the poor, reinforcing racism and amplifying inequality.


These "WMDs," as she calls them, have three key features: They are opaque, scalable and unfair.

Denied a job because of a personality test? Too bad -- the algorithm said you wouldn't be a good fit. Charged a higher rate for a loan? Well, people in your zip code tend to be riskier borrowers. Received a harsher prison sentence? Here's the thing: Your friends and family have criminal records too, so you're likely to be a repeat offender. (Spoiler: The people on the receiving end of these messages don't actually get an explanation.)


The models O'Neil writes about all use proxies for what they're actually trying to measure. The police analyze zip codes to deploy officers, employers use credit scores to gauge responsibility, payday lenders assess grammar to determine credit worthiness. But zip codes are also a stand-in for race, credit scores for wealth, and poor grammar for immigrants






This is a modal window.

Something went wrong during native playback.
Wealth: America's other racial divide
Math is racist: How data is driving inequality

By Aimee Rawlins September 6, 2016: 5:24 PM ET


It's no surprise that inequality in the U.S. is on the rise. But what you might not know is that math is partly to blame.

In a new book, "Weapons of Math Destruction," Cathy O'Neil details all the ways that math is essentially being used for evil (my word, not hers).

From targeted advertising and insurance to education and policing, O'Neil looks at how algorithms and big data are targeting the poor, reinforcing racism and amplifying inequality.


These "WMDs," as she calls them, have three key features: They are opaque, scalable and unfair.

Denied a job because of a personality test? Too bad -- the algorithm said you wouldn't be a good fit. Charged a higher rate for a loan? Well, people in your zip code tend to be riskier borrowers. Received a harsher prison sentence? Here's the thing: Your friends and family have criminal records too, so you're likely to be a repeat offender. (Spoiler: The people on the receiving end of these messages don't actually get an explanation.)


The models O'Neil writes about all use proxies for what they're actually trying to measure. The police analyze zip codes to deploy officers, employers use credit scores to gauge responsibility, payday lenders assess grammar to determine credit worthiness. But zip codes are also a stand-in for race, credit scores for wealth, and poor grammar for immigrants.


Cathy O'Neil
O'Neil, who has a PhD in mathematics from Harvard, has done stints in academia, at a hedge fund during the financial crisis and as a data scientist at a startup. It was there -- in conjunction with work she was doing with Occupy Wall Street -- that she become disillusioned by how people were using data.

"I worried about the separation between technical models and real people, and about the moral repercussions of that separation," O'Neill writes.

She started blogging -- at mathbabe.org -- about her frustrations, which eventually turned into "Weapons of Math Destruction."

One of the book's most compelling sections is on "recidivism models." For years, criminal sentencing was inconsistent and biased against minorities. So some states started using recidivism models to guide sentencing. These take into account things like prior convictions, where you live, drug and alcohol use, previous police encounters, and criminal records of friends and family.

These scores are then used to determine sentencing.

"This is unjust," O'Neil writes. "Indeed, if a prosecutor attempted to tar a defendant by mentioning his brother's criminal record or the high crime rate in his neighborhood, a decent defense attorney would roar, 'Objection, Your Honor!'"

But in this case, the person is unlikely to know the mix of factors that influenced his or her sentencing -- and has absolutely no recourse to contest them.

Or consider the fact that nearly half of U.S. employers ask potential hires for their credit report, equating a good credit score with responsibility or trustworthiness.

This "creates a dangerous poverty cycle," O'Neil writes. "If you can't get a job because of your credit record, that record will likely get worse, making it even harder to work
W skrócie w swojej książce p. O'Neil opisuje kredyt socjalny, tylko wdrażany przez korporacje, a nie państwo jak w Chinach. Obserwuję to tutaj w Irlandii np. w sprawie kredytów czy ubezpieczeń (które wzrosły w przeciagu 1 roku niemal o 100%!) - firmy uciekają się do nielegalnych metod zbierania danych (np. medycznych) i ktoś kto ma np. raka nie dostanie kredytu na chatę, oraz dodatkowo jest umieszczany w tajnych bazach korporacyjnych. W przyszłości osoby takie jak ja np. będą odcinane od Internetu - żadna firma nie będzie chciała założyć stałego Internetu (w bazach Interpolu figuruję jako "prawie" terrorysta, element wywrotowy), oczywiście jeśli nie nastąpi odwrót od feudalizmu korporacyjnego i państwa się zliberalizują.

PS. Pytanie do libków: jeśli mamy zmowę firm prywatnych energetycznych, które są kontrolowane przez oligarchię, to czy te firmy powinny mieć prawo do zerwania umowy z Libem, który jest "elementem aspołecznym", krytykującym tę oligarchię? Zerwania w taki sposób, że nie będzie Libek miał prądu... A co z wodą? Też można ją odciąć "elementom aspołecznym", jeśli właścicielem byłby prywatny monopolista? Pamiętajmy, że nawet komuniści w PRLu tego nie robili...
 
Ostatnia edycja:

Zbyszek_Z

Well-Known Member
964
2 178
Sugerujesz, że państwo powinno zmusić banki, by traktowały śmiertelnie chorych, biednych czy starych jako takich samych kredytobiorców jak innych?

Ciekawe czy pożyczyłbyś swoje oszczędności osobie, której został miesiąc życia.
 

Redrum

Active Member
674
159
żadna firma nie będzie chciała założyć stałego Internetu (w bazach Interpolu figuruję jako "prawie" terrorysta, element wywrotowy)
W sensie nie powinniśmy ponosić odpowiedzialnosci za swoje czyny?

jeśli mamy zmowę firm prywatnych energetycznych, które są kontrolowane przez oligarchię, to czy te firmy powinny mieć prawo do zerwania umowy z Libem, który jest "elementem aspołecznym", krytykującym tę oligarchię?
Zależy od warunków umowy.
 

kompowiec

Open Source Boy
1 609
1 510
PS. Pytanie do libków: jeśli mamy zmowę firm prywatnych energetycznych, które są kontrolowane przez oligarchię, to czy te firmy powinny mieć prawo do zerwania umowy z Libem, który jest "elementem aspołecznym", krytykującym tę oligarchię? Zerwania w taki sposób, że nie będzie Libek miał prądu... A co z wodą? Też można ją odciąć "elementom aspołecznym", jeśli właścicielem byłby prywatny monopolista? Pamiętajmy, że nawet komuniści w PRLu tego nie robili...
Nikt Ci nie broni (na szczęście) by samemu wytwarzać prąd i czerpać wodę z studni, jedynie może być problem z sprzedażą nadwyżki bo to już jest reglamentowane przez państwo.

Co do internetu to zawsze zostaje opcja na kartę (tak wiem, nie jest to najlepszy internet ale i tak jest to lepsze niż nic) lub zainteresować się projektem Althea mesh

tldr; pozbądź się vendor lock
 

kr2y510

konfederata targowicki
12 149
20 473
Nikt Ci nie broni (na szczęście) by samemu wytwarzać prąd i czerpać wodę z studni,
Wytwarzanie prądu też jest regulowane. Wprawdzie panele regulowane nie są, ale postawienie Kaplana na swoim gruncie, który będzie korzystał z własnej wody jest problematyczne. Co do czerpania wody, to w 2016r. wprowadzili przepis, że na ujęcie własne potrzebna jest zgoda państwa. Trzeba też płacić podatek. Na początek dali 4 zł rocznie.
 

inho

Well-Known Member
1 542
3 551
Don’t kill mosquitoes - let them take blood donation, urges French animal-rights activist

***

Często w dyskusjach o prawach zwierząt pada argument ad absurdum o tym, czy można zabijać komary, muchy itp. Okazuje się, że w ramach galopującego progresywizmu argument ten powraca jako autentyczny postulat ochrony zwierząt...

Aymeric Caron - francuski prezenter telewizyjny i aktywista praw zwierząt zaapelował o to, żeby nie uniemożliwiać komarom picia ludzkiej krwi. Jego zdaniem ludzie powinni zdać sobie sprawę, że kąsające ich komary to "matki, które zbierają białko dla swojego głodnego potomstwa" i powinni traktować cały ten proces jak donację krwi dla potrzebujących.
 

Maksymiliana

Everyday Hero
212
107
Nie no bez jaj, jak mnie mucha wkurwia to ją rozwalam, tak samo komara.
JEDNAK
Gołębie, ptaszki, zwierzęta domowe - tego już zabijać nie wolno - oczywiście jak Ci wpadnie na jezdnie 2m przed tobą - to oczywistość, że zabijesz, ALE NIE CELOWO.
 

WoKu

Anarchoautystyk
212
376
Don’t kill mosquitoes - let them take blood donation, urges French animal-rights activist

***

Często w dyskusjach o prawach zwierząt pada argument ad absurdum o tym, czy można zabijać komary, muchy itp. Okazuje się, że w ramach galopującego progresywizmu argument ten powraca jako autentyczny postulat ochrony zwierząt...

Aymeric Caron - francuski prezenter telewizyjny i aktywista praw zwierząt zaapelował o to, żeby nie uniemożliwiać komarom picia ludzkiej krwi. Jego zdaniem ludzie powinni zdać sobie sprawę, że kąsające ich komary to "matki, które zbierają białko dla swojego głodnego potomstwa" i powinni traktować cały ten proces jak donację krwi dla potrzebujących.
 

pawlis

Samotny wilk
2 254
7 980
Jego zdaniem ludzie powinni zdać sobie sprawę, że kąsające ich komary to "matki, które zbierają białko dla swojego głodnego potomstwa" i powinni traktować cały ten proces jak donację krwi dla potrzebujących.
Jasia ugryzł komar, jednak poszkodowany go wypuścił. Kolega pyta Jasia:
- Dlaczego go wypuściłeś?
- Przecież płynie w nim moja krew.


:)
 

MaxStirner

Well-Known Member
2 337
3 876
Jak może niektórym wiadomo Laura Loomer konserwatywna blogerka (nota bene dumna Żydówka co jest w tej kombinacji chyba rzadko spotykane) znana min z lamerskich akcji typu przykucie sie do siedziby Twittera w proteście przeciw cenzurze, tym razem pozwala facebooka o znieslawienie - chodzi o przerózne wyzwiska i epitety typy far right, racist, oskarżanie o hate speech itp.
Facebook niedawno odpowiedzial na pozew wnioskujac o jego oddalenie. Ciekawa jest ale argumentacja użyta w tym wniosku. Otóz powołuja sie oni na pierwsza poprawkę - twierdzą że pozew jest bezzasadny bo opinie -w przeciwienstwie do stwierdzenia faktu - nie podlegają ocenie prawnej, a wolny przepływ idei zapewnia równowagę między opiniami krzywdzącymi a słusznymi!
Ja pierdolę!
"Under the First Amendment, “There can be no false ideas.” (!!!!) Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc., 418 U.S. 323, 339-40 (1974). Accordingly, “statements that are not readily capable of being proven false and statements of pure opinion are protected from defamation actions.” Turner, 879
F.3d at 1262-63; see also Keller v. Miami Herald Publ’g Co., 778 F.2d 711, 717 (11th Cir. 1985)
(“Opinions are protected from defamation actions by the first amendment.”);
This is because “[h]owever pernicious an opinion may seem, we depend for its correction not on the conscience of judges and juries but on the competition of other ideas.” Gertz,
418 U.S. at 339-40. “Whether the statement is one of fact or opinion [is a] question[] of law for the court.” Turner, 879 F.3d at 1262-63; see also Rodriguez v. Panayiotou, 314 F.3d 979, 985-86
(9th Cir. 2002) (“[W]hether an allegedly defamatory statement constitutes fact or opinion is a question of law for the court to decide.”).
Applying this principle, courts have long held that assertions of bigotry, racism, prejudice, and political extremism are in the eye of the beholder, and therefore constitute subjective opinion that cannot be the basis for a defamation claim. See, e.g., Buckley v. Littell, 539 F.2d 882, 893-95
 

pawlis

Samotny wilk
2 254
7 980
Emoji Ok trafia na listę symboli mowy nienawiści

Popularne emoji Ok zostało umieszczone na liście symboli mowy nienawiści. Znalazło się tam za sprawą amerykańskiej Ligi Przeciwko Zniesławieniu. Według członków tej organizacji wynika to z faktu, że część osób używa tego symbolu w trakcie szczerego wyrażania białej supremacji. Na liście ADL jest już ponad 200 wpisów.

Emoji Ok zna chyba każdy z nas. Mało tego, bardzo często je używamy. Co jednak ciekawe, ten popularny symbol został umieszczony przez amerykańską Ligę Przeciwko Zniesławieniu (ADL) na liście znaków mowy nienawiści. Tuż obok swastyki czy krzyża Ku Klux Klanu.

Jak wyjaśniają członkowie ADL, emoji Ok ma nie tylko pozytywne skojarzenia. Część osób używa tego znaku również w trakcie szczerego wyrażania białej supremacji. Dlatego został on wpisany na "czarną listę". Co jednak bardzo ciekawe, za całą sytuacją ukrywa się żart.


Symbol Ok miał prezentować literę W (otwarte palce) oraz P (zamknięte) i miało to być tajnym znakiem. Biali nacjonaliści podchwycili pomysł, choć nie do końca rozumiejąc, dlaczego tak się dzieje, bo w rzeczywistości zostali strollowani. Zazwyczaj symbol używany jest w pozytywnym kontekście, ale nie zawsze tak musi być. Stąd też potrzeba jego oflagowania.

Mowa nienawiści to problem, który narasta w internecie. Zdają sobie z tego sprawę także Facebook i YouTube, którzy szukają nowych pomysłów na walkę z treściami o takich poglądach.
 
Do góry Bottom